Today's author, Tiffany

Tomorrow we embark on our last day of excavation. I’m both happy and sad to see it go. I will be happy to be clean and dry, but sad for the amazing experience to be over. This summer we have unearthed objects that have been hidden in the earth for over one hundred years and to me that is pretty amazing. The Unger family’s trash is our treasures. It is so exciting to see that small sparkling white edge of a broken piece of pottery protruding from the ground. I had always been told in my archaeology classes that pottery preserves well, but I was still so surprised to see that after you wipe the mud off with your fingers it still gleams and shines like the day it was made.

Students working in the field

A couple of weeks ago in the area where I was working a few of us started coming across a lot very similar, thick white pottery sherds which we assumed must be from the same vessel. On a rainy day last week I stayed in to catalog my artifacts and when I came across the big pottery pieces it sparked my curiosity. I got to go into the museum collections so I could compare the angle of the curve of the fragments to full pieces so as we could better guess on what it was. We concluded that it could have been a wash basin. Next week when all the students spend the week in the lab doing our lab reports, we will all have to bring together all of our pieces and see if we can tell if my guess is correct or not.

In the lab, looking at the shoes from the 2011 excavation.

Steinbachonline.com is Steinbach's only source for community news and information such as weather and classifieds.

About the Author

Barry is the Executive Director of the Mennonite Heritage Village. While he does not consider himself to be a historian, he places a high value on the preservation and interpretation of the Mennonite and pioneer stories that help people of all ages understand and appreciate their heritage. Learn more about the MHV.

Login